The Birth of Magic

As in crazy short, in a very short period of time we have two very different companies looking at two very different ways to eliminate traffic. Tesla wantsto tunnel under the ground to avoid traffic, while Uber wants to fly overhead.

Transportation has been a tad static for the last 40 years or so, and that apparently is about to change big time, as some folks even are reconsidering lighter-than-air transport.

This is just the start. There are amazing efforts cropping up all over the U.S., suggesting that we may be building a lot of things that truly are magical. I’ll share my thoughts on this coming industrial revolution and close with my product of the week: a very advanced, almost pocketable drone that is small enough for inside and powerful enough to fly outside.

The Death of Innovation

Both transportation and advancement have a mixed history. At the beginning of the 20th century, we moved from horses to cars. Ford even created one of the most reliable airliners in the world and was well down

Work Into Social Networking

Jobs will appear in users’ News Feeds and also will be listed on individual businesses’ pages. Users can click on the Apply Now button to trigger the prepopulation of their personal information, but they will be able to review and edit that information before submitting their application.

Over the next few weeks, companies in the U.S. and Canada will be able to list jobs on their own pages and users will be able to find job listings at Jobs on Facebook.

It is not clear how Facebook intends to monetize the job listings. For example, will there be specific job-related charges for listing jobs? Will there be remuneration if a company fills a particular job through a Facebook ad?

 

Direct Competitors

The new functionality is certain to place Facebook into direct competition with LinkedIn for corporate users and individual job seekers. LinkedIn, which Microsoft last year acquired for US$26.2 billion, is the leading social media site for networking and job searching in the U.S., by many accounts.

Unlike Facebook, LinkedIn charges monthly subscription fees for job search services, depending on the level of functionality the user desires

Best emulation for a future artificial intelligence system

President Trump offers a good emulation for a future artificial intelligence system, suggests a column I read earlier this month, and his presidency may be an early warning of what could happen if we should fail to think through its training and information sources.

Cathy O’Neil, the author of the piece, is a data scientist, mathematician and professor, so she has decent chops. She compares artificial intelligence to human intelligence that is mostly id — basically because we don’t yet know how to instill it with empathy, or create the digital equivalent of a conscience.

Given that IBM’s Watson was designed not to replace humans but to enhance them by giving them the critical information they need to make the best decisions, it could be a useful tool for training our new president. And it is built in the U.S. by a U.S. company.

Given that Watson is now doing our taxes, it could be huge both for the president and IBM. I’ll explain and then close with my product of the week: Nvidia’s new set-top box.

Id-Driven

Plug on Thousands of Dark Net

This incident supposedly was the first hack carried out by the attacker, who claimed responsibility in an interview with Motherboard. In addition to taking Freedom II offline, the person stole 74 gigabytes in files and a 2.3-GB database.

The database stolen from Freedom II contains 381,000 email addresses — thousands of them with .gov extensions, Troy Hunt, who runs the Have I Been Pwned website, told Wired.

However, those .gov addresses may not be legitimate, he noted.

The hack of Freedom II was relatively rudimentary, said Tim Condello, technical account manager and security researcher at RedOwl.

“They identified a configuration issue and used it to identify the root user of the system and gain control of it that way,” he told TechNewsWorld. After gaining control of the system, “they overwrote the index file and redirected the landing page for all the websites to a landing page containing their message.”

 

Shared Vulnerabilities

This attack demonstrates that when it comes to resistance to vulnerabilities, the Dark Web doesn’t have an edge.

“The underlying technology of the Dark Web isn’t anything revolutionary. The way a content management system or a hosting service operates is identical to how it’s done on the open Web,” Condello said.

“The difference is how the content

Personal Cargo Robots

Welcome to Gadget Dreams and Nightmares, the column that occasionally stops gaping at contentious Senate confirmation hearings and votes to peruse the latest gadget announcements.

This time around, we’re looking at some of the gadgets that perhaps got a little lost in the noise after CES in January but caught our eye, for better or worse. Among them are a 4-D arcade machine and a robot designed to carry all the things you don’t want to.

As ever, dear readers, this is not a review column, in part because these products have yet to reach the public sphere, but mostly because the chances of my actually ever using said products are slim. The ratings relate only to how much I’d like to try them, should the stars align.

Reality Bites

Regular readers will know that I’ve played games my entire life. I hold deep reverence for the care and attention that go into creating these experiences, and I’ve rarely met a game I didn’t want to conquer.

Yet I am nervous about virtual reality. I’ve tried it and found those disorientating worlds difficult to handle, though I suspect that over time I could grow

Apps Vulnerable to WiFi Snooping

Strafach categorized another 24 iOS apps as “medium risk.” Potentially intercepted information included service login credentials and session authentication tokens for users logged onto the network.

Strafach labeled the remaining apps “high risk” because potentially intercepted information included the snatching of financial or medical services login credentials.

He did not identify the medium and high risk apps by name, in order to give their makers time to patch the vulnerability in their apps.

How concerned should users be about their security when using these apps?

“I tried to leave out anything regarding concern level, as I do not want to freak people out too much,” Strafach told TechNewsWorld.

“While this is indeed a big concern in my opinion, it can be mostly mitigated by turning off WiFi and using a cellular connection to perform sensitive actions — such as checking bank balances — while in public,” he said.

 

Man in the Middle Attack

If anything, Strafach is understating the problem, maintained Dave Jevans, vice president for mobile security products at Proofpoint.

“We’ve analyzed millions of apps and found this is a widespread problem,” he told TechNewsWorld, “and it’s not just iOS. It’s Android, too.”

Still, it likely is not yet a cause for great alarm, according to Seth Hardy,

Cybersecurity Warriors

“Today’s sophisticated cybersecurity threats attack on multiple fronts to conceal their activities, and our security analysts face the difficult task of pinpointing these attacks amongst a massive sea of security-related data,” noted Sean Valcamp, chief information security officer at Avnet, an early tester of the Watson for Cyber Security system.

“Watson makes concealment efforts more difficult by quickly analyzing multiple streams of data and comparing it with the latest security attack intelligence to provide a more complete picture of the threat,” he said.

“Watson also generates reports on these threats in a matter of minutes, which greatly speeds the time between detecting a potential event and my security team’s ability to respond accordingly,” Valcamp added.

Only 7 percent of security pros currently use cognitive tools in their workflow, but that is changing, according to IBM, which expects usage to triple in the next two to three years.

That’s because as more and more devices come online, they create a burden on security teams they won’t be able to handle without the help an AI like Watson.

“The attack surface for the attacker is mushrooming,” Kennelly said. “Tools like Watson can help defend against those expanding attack patterns.”

 

Voice-Powered Security Assistant

IBM also announced the Havyn Project, which

Bug in the Bud

“This happened in response to a very small number of requests in the Cloudflare system — about 1 in 3.3 million,” a Cloudflare spokesperson said in a statement provided to TechNewsWorld by company rep Katie Warmuth.

Some of that data had been cached by search engines.

Cloudflare reviewed the available related cached information and “took comprehensive steps to clean up any residual material found in storage caches,” the spokesperson noted.

Cloudflare found that data for about 150 of its 6 million customers had been impacted.

The company has reached out to “a number of search engines to review and remediate the information in their caches,” the spokesperson said.

All identified episodes have been cleaned, and Cloudflare continues to work to confirm whether other residue persists.

There are at least 16 other search engines on the Web apart from Google, including Bing and Duck Duck Go.

What Happened

Tavis Ormandy, a vulnerability researcher with Google’s Project Zero, notified Cloudflare about the problem on Feb. 17. The memory leak occurred from September to Feb. 18, with the greatest period of impact being from Feb. 13-18.

A bug in Cloudflare’s Ragel-based parser was the cause. It had been dormant for years, but

Steady Enterprise March

Enterprise IT decision makers have been exploring the potential of Internet of Things technologies, but they are not rushing IoT projects into development and are showing caution in their adoption commitments, according to survey results Red Hat released Wednesday.

Of the 215 participants in the company’s survey, “Enterprise IoT in 2017: Steady as she goes,” 55 percent indicated that IoT was important to their organization. However, only a quarter of those organizations actually were writing project code and deploying IoT technologies.

Enterprise interest in IoT has been deliberate and careful, Red Hat’s findings suggest.

Open source software is well positioned to be the dominant technology for IoT development, and open source partners will be vital to project success, the survey results indicate.

The latest survey was a follow-up to Red Hat’s 2015 survey on IoT interest in the enterprise. While it appears that interest in IoT is picking up, companies are approaching actual rollouts with the common enterprise IT theme of “steady deliberation.”

The aim of the 2015 survey was to find out if people were building IoT solutions from scratch or were leveraging pieces from other projects and adding an IoT component, said Lis Strenger, senior principal product marketing manager for Red Hat.

“Knowing

Gigabit Wireless and the Anti iPhone Set

One of the biggest disappointments at this year’s Mobile World Congress, which opened Monday, is that the Samsung Galaxy 8 phone won’t make it. The phone’s official launch is scheduled for March 29.

The Galaxy line has been the ultimate iPhone fighter. Rumors around the anniversary edition of the iPhone suggest that it will do amazing, magical things, like 3D selfies. (OK, I’m really missing Steve Jobs at the moment — who the hell wants 3D selfies?!?)

Missing the biggest historical alternative is keeping a lot of us home this week. Still LG, Motorola, Lenovo and Qualcomm are expected to make huge announcements that could result in the iPhone 8 looking a tad out of date when it finally launches later in the year.

I’ll share some observations on what they have in store and close with my product of the week: a new PC camera from Logitech that enables Microsoft Hello on laptops and desktop PCs that otherwise wouldn’t support it. (When it works, Microsoft Hello is actually pretty cool.)

Gigabit Wireless

Some of this stuff we can anticipate just from Qualcomm launches. Perhaps the biggest of late is the Qualcomm X20 Modem. This part

Digital VP Beena Ammanath

Ammanath also serves on the Cal Poly Computer Engineering ProgramIndustrial Advisory Board, helping to shape the future generation of computer scientists with her expertise. She recently was named one of the top female analytics experts in the Fortune 500 by Forbescontributor Meta S. Brown.

In this exclusive interview, Ammanath speaks to TechNewsWorld about AI, analytics, and diversity in tech.

TechNewsWorld: You are one of the thought leaders on artificial intelligence. How do you think AI will impact businesses and jobs?

Beena Ammanath: I have worked in a number of industries — e-commerce, financial, marketing, telecom, retail, software products and industrial — over the past two decades. I have seen how the growth of data from OLTP systems to data warehouses to big data and data science has impacted businesses.

I believe we are just at the tip of the iceberg with AI today. AI is not by itself an industry — more of a technology that is positioned to transform businesses across a number of sectors. AI will be so intertwined and pervasive within business operations in the future that it may be impossible to do business without AI. Fundamental business models of today are going to change, as AI evolves.

Tesla’s driverless car is

The Reason Linux Desktop Does Better

First and foremost, Linux is literally free. Neither the operating system nor any of the programs you run will cost you a dime. Beyond the obvious financial benefit of getting software for free, Linux allows users to be free by affording access to the basic tools of modern computer use — such as word processing and photo editing — which otherwise might be unavailable due to the cost barrier.

Microsoft Office, which sets the de facto standard formats for documents of nearly every kind, demands a US$70 per year subscription. However, you can run LibreOffice for free while still handling documents in all the same formats with ease.

Free software also gives you the chance to try new programs, and with them new ways of pursuing business and leisure, without their prospective costs forcing you to make a commitment.

Instead of painstakingly weighing the merits of Mac or Windows and then taking a leap of faith, you can consider a vast spectrum of choices offered by hundreds of distributions — basically, different flavors of Linux — by trying each in turn until you find the one that’s right for you.

Linux can even save money on hardware, as some manufacturers — notably Dell —

Thwarting API

A new tool is available to check the persistent harassment of online trolls. Google’s Jigsaw think tank last week launched Perspective, an early stage technology that uses machine learning to help neutralize trolls.

Perspective reviews comments and scores them based on their similarity to comments people have labeled as toxic, or that are likely to result in someone leaving a conversation.

Publishers can select what they want to do with the information Perspective provides to them. Their options include the following:

  • Flagging comments for their own moderators to review;
  • Providing tools to help users understand the potential toxicity of comments as they write them; and
  • Letting readers sort comments based on their likely toxicity.

Forty-seven percent of 3,000 Americans aged 15 or older reported experiencing online harassment or abuse, according to a survey Data & Society conducted last year. More 70 percent said they had witnessed online harassment or abuse.

Perspective got its training through an examination of hundreds of thousands of comments labeled by human reviewers who were asked to rate online comments on a scale from “very toxic” to “very healthy.”

Like all machine learning applications, Perspective improves as it’s used.

Partners and Future Plans

A number of partners have signed on to work with

Display Top Latest iPhone Rumor List

Apple poked a hornet’s nest when it removed the standard headphone jack from the iPhone 7. It may do it again by replacing the Lightning port with USB-C in the next iPhone.

The Lightning port, introduced in 2012, is used to charge and connect accessories to the iPhone, but Apple plans to swap it for USB-C, which the company has been introducing into its computer lines, The Wall Street Journal reported Tuesday.

“It would be a bold step for Apple, because it would mean Apple would be dependent on the advance of the USB-C standard for any innovations they may want to make around physical connectors,” said IHS Markit Senior Director Ian Fogg.

In the past, Apple chose to use its own home-brewed connectors for the iPhone — first its dock connector, then Lightning.

“Both of them allowed Apple to innovate more quickly than the industry because they weren’t dependent on standards,” Fogg told TechNewsWorld, “and it enabled them to have a business model around accessories through third-party companies, where Apple could ensure quality and collect a license fee.”

USB-C: Good and Bad

It’s not likely that Apple will scrap the Lightning connector, said David McQueen, a

More Women in Tech

riana Gascoigne is the founder and CEO of Girls in Tech, a global nonprofit organization whose mission is to “engage, educate, and empower girls who are passionate about technology.”

Girls in Tech CEO Adriana Gascoigne

Founded in 2007, Girls in Tech claims 60 chapters with upwards of 50,000 members worldwide. The organization’s focus is not just on women in professional roles. It also offers support to anyone with an interest in technology, providing women with a platform for growth in the field.

In this exclusive interview, Gascoigne speaks to TechNewsWorld about he organization’s purpose, its accomplishments thus far, and its future hopes and plans.

 

Adriana Gascoigne: I was working at a startup and was one of very few women there. I’d look around the room every day and see that there was a huge problem of representation. I knew we needed to change the culture of the company to recruit more women and benefit more women, but we also needed diversity in product development.

If you have a diverse team, your product is going to be more successful. I think having a diverse group of people helps you to make a better product in the end, and I was striving to create a

Increase the safety of users

Twitter on Wednesday announced that over the next few months it will roll out changes designed to increase the safety of users:

  • Its algorithms will help identify accounts as they engage in abusive behavior, so the burden no longer will be on victims to report it;
  • Users will be able to limit certain account functionality, such as letting only followers see their tweets, for a set amount of time;
  • New filtering options will give users more control over what they see from certain types of accounts — such as those without profile pictures, or with unverified email addresses or phone numbers; and
  • New mute functionality will let users mute tweets from within their home timelines, and decide how long the content will be muted.

Twitter also will be more transparent about actions it takes in response to reports of harassment from users.

“These updates are part of the ongoing safety work we announced in January, and follow our changes announced on February 7,” a Twitter spokesperson said in a statement provided to TechNewsWorld by Liz Kelley of the company’s communications department.

A Fine Balance

“We’re giving people the choice to filter notifications in a variety of ways, including

Quantum Leap Could Redefine

No, I’m not talking about that Quantum Leap. IBM just made a really interesting announcement in that it is enhancing its online quantum computer systems with a new API and improving its simulator so it can handle 20 qubits.

While listening to the prebriefing was a bit like pretending I was Penny trying to understand Sheldon Cooper on Big Bang Theory, I think this move does showcase yet another huge approaching computing wave that could eclipse the one we currently are trying desperately, but largely failing, to ride.

I’ll share some thoughts on quantum computing and close with my product of the week: the Arlo Security Camera system from Netgear, which has to be the best comprehensive home security system in the market.

It is easy to get lost in the terminology surrounding quantum computing and glaze over. Basically, quantum computing is a revolutionary, not evolutionary, system that is pretty much indistinguishable from magic.

Let me give you an example. With a regular computing system at a machine language level you have 1s and 0s — an element is one or the other. With quantum computing, an element is both at the same time. This is like someone asking if your new car

Lab Linux Is a Rare Treat

The latest release of Black Lab Linux, an Ubuntu 16.04-based distribution, adds a Unity desktop option. You will not find Unity offered by any other major — or nearly any minor — Linux distributor outside of Ubuntu.

Black Lab Linux 8.0, the consumer version of PC/OpenSystems’ flagship distro, also updates several other prominent desktop options.

Black Lab Linux is a general purpose community distribution for home users and small-to-mid-sized businesses. PC/OpenSystems also offers Black Lab Enterprise Linux, a commercial counterpart for businesses that want support services.

Black Lab Linux is an outgrowth of OS4 OpenLinux, a distro the same developers released in 2008. Both the community and the commercial releases could be a great alternative for personal and business users who want to avoid the UEFI (Unified Extensible Firmware Interface) horrors of installing Linux in a computer bought off the shelf with Microsoft Windows preinstalled.

Black Lab offers its flagship releases with a choice of self or full support, and both come at a price upon launch. However, you can wait 45 days and get the same release with the self-support option for free. Black Lab Linux 8.0 became available for free late last year.

Black Lab 8.0 with Unity gave me a few

Open Source Devs to Give E2EMail Encryption

Google last week released its E2EMail encryption code to open source as a way of pushing development of the technology.

“Google has been criticized over the amount of time and seeming lack of progress it has made in E2EMail encryption, so open sourcing the code could help the project proceed more quickly,” said Charles King, principal analyst at Pund-IT.

That will not stop critics, as reactions to the decision have shown, he told LinuxInsider.

However, it should enable the company to focus its attention and resources on issues it believes are more pressing, King added.

Google started the E2EMail project more than a year ago, as a way to give users a Chrome app that would allow the simple exchange of private emails.

The project integrates OpenPGP into Gmail via a Chrome extension. It brings improved usability and keeps all cleartext of the message body exclusively on the client.

E2EMail is built on a proven, open source Javascript crypto library developed at Google, noted KB Sriram, Eduardo Vela Nava and Stephan Somogyi, members of Google’s Security and Privacy Engineering team, in an online post.

The early versions of E2EMail are text-only and support only PGP/MIME messages. It now uses its own keyserver.

The encryption application eventually will

Linux Begins

Once you have a sense of the vast potential of Linux, you may be eager to experience it for yourself. Considering the complexity of modern operating systems, though, it can be hard to know where to start.

As with many things, computers can be better understood through a breakdown of their evolution and operation. The terminal is not only where computers began, but also where their real power still resides. I’ll provide here a brief introduction to the terminal, how it works, and how you can explore further on your own.

Although “terminal,” “command line,” and “shell” are often used interchangeably, it helps to learn the general distinctions between these terms. The word “terminal” comes from the old days of Unix — the architecture on which Linux is based — when university campuses and research facilities had a room-sized computer, and users interacted with it by accessing keyboard-and-screen terminals scattered around the campus and connected to the central hub with long cables.

Today, most of us don’t deal with true terminals like those. Instead, we access emulators — interfaces on Unix-like systems that mimic the terminal’s control mechanism. The kind of terminal emulator you’re most likely to see is called a “pseudo-terminal.”

Also