Lab Linux Is a Rare Treat

The latest release of Black Lab Linux, an Ubuntu 16.04-based distribution, adds a Unity desktop option. You will not find Unity offered by any other major — or nearly any minor — Linux distributor outside of Ubuntu.

Black Lab Linux 8.0, the consumer version of PC/OpenSystems’ flagship distro, also updates several other prominent desktop options.

Black Lab Linux is a general purpose community distribution for home users and small-to-mid-sized businesses. PC/OpenSystems also offers Black Lab Enterprise Linux, a commercial counterpart for businesses that want support services.

Black Lab Linux is an outgrowth of OS4 OpenLinux, a distro the same developers released in 2008. Both the community and the commercial releases could be a great alternative for personal and business users who want to avoid the UEFI (Unified Extensible Firmware Interface) horrors of installing Linux in a computer bought off the shelf with Microsoft Windows preinstalled.

Black Lab offers its flagship releases with a choice of self or full support, and both come at a price upon launch. However, you can wait 45 days and get the same release with the self-support option for free. Black Lab Linux 8.0 became available for free late last year.

Black Lab 8.0 with Unity gave me a few problems depending on the hardware I tested. It sometimes was slow to load various applications. It more than occasionally locked up. However, its performance usually was trouble-free on more resource-rich computers.

Its core set of specs are nice but nothing that outclasses other fully free Linux OS options. Here is a quick rundown on the updated packages. Remember that version 8.0 is based on Ubuntu 16.04, which is a solid starting point.