The Reason Linux Desktop Does Better

First and foremost, Linux is literally free. Neither the operating system nor any of the programs you run will cost you a dime. Beyond the obvious financial benefit of getting software for free, Linux allows users to be free by affording access to the basic tools of modern computer use — such as word processing and photo editing — which otherwise might be unavailable due to the cost barrier.

Microsoft Office, which sets the de facto standard formats for documents of nearly every kind, demands a US$70 per year subscription. However, you can run LibreOffice for free while still handling documents in all the same formats with ease.

Free software also gives you the chance to try new programs, and with them new ways of pursuing business and leisure, without their prospective costs forcing you to make a commitment.

Instead of painstakingly weighing the merits of Mac or Windows and then taking a leap of faith, you can consider a vast spectrum of choices offered by hundreds of distributions — basically, different flavors of Linux — by trying each in turn until you find the one that’s right for you.

Linux can even save money on hardware, as some manufacturers — notably Dell — offer a discount for buying a computer with Linux preinstalled. They can charge less because they don’t have to pass on the cost of licensing Windows from Microsoft.

 

You Can Make It Your Own

There is practically nothing in Linux that can’t be customized. Among the projects central to the Linux ecosystem are desktop environments — that is, collections of basic user programs and visual elements, like status bars and launchers, that make up the user interface.

Some Linux distributions come bundled with a desktop environment. Ubuntu is paired with the Unity desktop, for example. Others, such as with Debian, give you a choice at installation. In either case, users are free to change to any one they like.

Most distributions officially support (i.e., vouch for compatibility) dozens of the most popular desktops, which makes finding the one you like best that much simpler. Within the pantheon of desktops, you can find anything from glossy modern interfaces like KDE Plasma or Gnome, to simple and lightweight ones like Xfce and MATE. Within each of these, you can personalize your setup further by changing the themes, system trays and menus, choosing from galleries of other users’ screens for inspiration.

The customization possibilities go well beyond aesthetics. If you prize system stability, you can run a distribution like Mint, which offers dependable hardware support and ensures smooth updates.

On the other hand, if you want to live on the cutting edge, you can install an OS like Arch Linux, which gives you the latest update to each program as soon as developers release it.